Path at Kelvin Walkway in summer sunshine

Path at Kelvin Walkway in summer sunshine


Welcome to this illustrated guide to the Kelvin Walkway on the north bank of the River Kelvin. It covers the walk from the Belmont Bridge in the heart of the west end to the abandoned railway bridge over the river, which once carried the disused line from Maryhill towards the Botanic Gardens.
The walkway passes by some very interesting and picturesque sites on this stretch of the river. It is a little known treasure of Glasgow’s west end, only a stone throw from the area’s hub at Byres Road on the other side of the Botanic Gardens.
The original stretch of the walkway, on the north bank facing the Botanic Gardens, has been in public ownership since 1895. The City had taken over the privately owned Gardens on 1st November 1891 and thereafter added another 8 acres on both sides of the river in 1895. Footbridges were provided to give visitors to the Gardens access to the narrow strip of parkland on the other side of the river.

Kelvin Walkway from Belmont Bridge to disused Railway Bridge

Kelvin Walkway from Belmont Bridge to disused Railway Bridge


Footbridge leading to Kelvin Walkway at North Woodside Flint Mill

Footbridge, upstream from Belmont Bridge, leading to Kelvin Walkway at North Woodside Flint Mill


Map of North Woodside Flint Mill from 1858

Map of North Woodside Flint Mill from 1858, showing "Mill Lade" channelling water to power the mill


Pencil Sketch of North Woodside Flint Mill

Pencil Sketch of North Woodside Flint Mill


Channel leading to sluice gate at North Woodside Flint Mill

Channel leading to sluice gate at North Woodside Flint Mill


The sluice gate controlled the flow rates of the water being channelled in to drive the millwheels

The sluice gate controlled the flow rates of the water being channelled in to drive the millwheels


Ruins of North Woodside Flint Mill

Ruins of North Woodside Flint Mill


Stone grindstone at North Woodside Flint Mill

Stone grindstone at North Woodside Flint Mill, placed here from another site


South pier and stunted remains of central pier of original Queen Margaret Bridge which was dismantled in 1971

South pier and stunted remains of central pier of original Queen Margaret Bridge, which was dismantled in 1971


Weir on River Kelvin, downstream from Queen Margaret Bridge

Uprooted tree at weir on River Kelvin, downstream from Queen Margaret Bridge


Reflections on calm water appoaching weir on River Kelvin

Reflections on calm water appoaching weir on River Kelvin


Underneath the Queen Margaret Bridge on the Kelvin Walkway

Shadows underneath the Queen Margaret Bridge on the Kelvin Walkway


Ramblers on wooded banks of River Kelvin

Ramblers on wooded banks of River Kelvin


Humpback bridge over River Kelvin

Humpback bridge over River Kelvin


The Kelvin Walkway was the scene of the first ever murder in "Taggart", back in the early eighties.
One of the many suspects reached a dead end at this bridge which had an outsized stage padlock stopping him from crossing the Kelvin!

View through ironwork at Humpback Bridge, Kelvin Walkway

View through ironwork at Humpback Bridge, Kelvin Walkway


One of the earliest crossings in the vicinity was at the site of the present day Ha’penny Bridge. There was "an old and decrepit foot-bridge" providing access to the Three Tree Well, which was out of use shortly after this engraving was prepared in 1871.

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Watercolour of foot-bridge at Three Tree Well, 1848

Watercolour of "old and decrepit foot-bridge" at Three Tree Well, 1848

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Painting of remains of an unidentified bridge over the Kelvin

Painting of remains of an unidentified bridge over the Kelvin near the Three Tree Well, c.1880


The present day Ha’penny Bridge dates from 2002, when it was erected as a replacement for the ugly wrought-iron box-girder toll bridge which was washed away by floodwater on 10th December 1994.
This neat little timber footbridge is one of the few modern features to be seen along the Kelvin Walkway.
The earlier bridge had been constructed to provide access to Kirklee Station, which had been created near the site of the "Three Tree Well" on the northern edge of Botanic Gardens.

Ha'penny Bridge, Kelvin Walkway

Ha'penny Bridge, Kelvin Walkway


Map form 1894 showing Ha'penny Bridge leading to platforms of Kirklee Station

Map from 1894 showing Ha'penny Bridge leading to platforms of Kirklee Station


Kirklee Station lay between Maryhill Central and Botanic Gardens Stations

Kirklee Station lay between Maryhill Central and Botanic Gardens Stations

Abandoned railway bridge over River Kelvin carrying line towards Botanic Gardens

Abandoned railway bridge over River Kelvin carrying line towards Botanic Gardens


Opening dates of Glasgow Central Railway

The Glasgow Central Railway had opened from Maryhill in November 1895 and was completed in August 1896


Footpath under the Kirklee Bridge on the Kelvin Walkway

Footpath under the Kirklee Bridge on the Kelvin Walkway


The Garrioch Mill was situated upstream from the North Woodside Flint Mill. It also was originally a grist mill and later a flint mill.

Watercolour of Garrioch Mill, 1848

Watercolour of Garrioch Mill, 1848


Garrioch Footbridge, Kelvin Walkway

Garrioch Footbridge, Kelvin Walkway



Drawing of statue of St George and the Dragon, St Georges Cross, Glasgow © G.Blaikie 2011

 Introduction
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 Hillhead
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 North Kelvinside
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 Great Western Road
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 Kelvin Walkway
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 Park District
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 Woodside & Firhill
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 Partick
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 West End Quiz Pages
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 Dowanhill and Partick Churches
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 Scotcities Home Page
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 Gerald Blaikie - Prints and Canvasses


All original artwork, photography and text © Gerald Blaikie 2014
Unauthorised reproduction of any image on this website is not permitted.

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