Home Page - scotcities.com    South Side Guides    Contact   


The Glasgow district of Newlands originated as farmland around the manor house of Newlands. The estate was situated in Cathcart Parish on the opposite side of the White Cart Water from Pollokshaws which was in Eastwood Parish. The working farm buildings such as the stables, byre and dairy were situated at the "Mains of Newlands".
The nearby burgh of Pollokshaws was a busy manufacturing town with no administrative connections with Newlands which was developed as an area of upmarket Victorian villas with large garden grounds.

1850's map showing old parish boundary and Newlands House at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road

1850's map showing old parish boundary and Newlands House at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road


A notice was published in the Glasgow Herald on 28th July 1820, offering the "Farm of Newlands and Merrylee" for let. The lands were owned at that time by Mr James Tassie, who could be contacted at Pollok. Presumably the mansion house at Newlands was built some time between 1820 and 1855, when the map was surveyed.

1850's map showing old parish boundary and Newlands House at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road

Notice from Glasgow Herald, 28th July 1820, showing "Farm of Newlands and Merrylee"


Aerial view of site of Newlands House

Aerial view of site of Newlands House at corner of Newlands Road and Lubnaig Road


Newlands South Church

Newlands South Church

Newlands South Church originated in the hall to the rear which was designed by English architect Fred Rowntree for the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland.
The foundation stone was laid in September 1898 and the church was formally opened on 1st June, 1899.

Newlands South Church Hall: Erected AD MDCCCXCIX (1899)

Newlands South Church Hall: Erected AD MDCCCXCIX (1899)


The United Presbyterian Church merged with the Free Church in 1900 to become the United Free Church. Newlands United Free Church opened in 1903, designed in the Perpendicular Gothic style by Henry Edward Clifford. At the time of the church union in 1929 the building acquired its present title of Newlands South Church.

Newlands South Church

Newlands South Church


Reflection on main window at Newlands South Church

Reflection on main window at Newlands South Church


Frontage to Langside Drive of Newlands South Church

Frontage to Langside Drive of Newlands South Church


Old Photograph of Newlands South Church and Millbrae Bridge

Old Photograph of Newlands South Church and Millbrae Bridge


Early twentieth century view of Langside Drive, Newlands

Early twentieth century view of Langside Drive, Newlands


Tramcar at corner of Corrour Road and Kilmarnock Road, Newlands

Tramcar at corner of Corrour Road and Kilmarnock Road, Newlands, 1954


Gatehouse at entrance to Newlands Park

Gatehouse at entrance to Newlands Park


Springtime in Newlands Park

Springtime in Newlands Park


Arbour and spring foliage in Newlands Park

Arbour and spring foliage in Newlands Park


Aerial view of Newlands

Aerial view of villas surrounding Newlands Park at Kilmarnock Road entrance


Winter in Newlands Park with frozen pond

Winter in Newlands Park with frozen pond and icy ground


Very long shadow of tree trunk in Newlands Park

Very long shadow of tree trunk cast by the December sun, low in the horizon at dawn in Newlands Park


St Margaret's Episcopal Church, situated at the junction of Kilmarnock Road and Newlands Road, was designed in the Norman style by Peter MacGregor Chalmers and built in stages in the early twentieth century. The hall and vestries were completed in 1908, three years before work began on the main body of the church. The church was consecrated on Christmas Day 1928 and the tower added by 1935. The architect's original designs included a spire, which was never constructed.

Photograph of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Newlands, before the completion of the tower in 1935

Photograph of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church before the completion of the tower in 1935


LPerspective drawing of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Newlands, Glasgow

Perspective drawing of St. Margaret's Episcopal Church with proposed tower, 1934


View of tower at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

View of tower at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Shadows on St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Shadows on St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Altar at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Altar at St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


Dome over the altar at St. Margaret's Church depicting Christ the King

Dome over the altar at St. Margaret's Church depicting Christ the King


Interior view of St. Margaret's Church from the altar

Interior view of St. Margaret's Church from the altar


Dome over baptistry at Kilmarnock Road end of St. Margaret's Church

Dome over baptistry at Kilmarnock Road end of St. Margaret's Church


Font at baptistry  of St. Margaret's Church, Newlands

Font at baptistry of St. Margaret's Church, Newlands


No cars in sight in a tree-lined avenue in Newlands

No cars in sight in a tree-lined avenue in Newlands


Map showing Newlands House and Mains of Newlands in 1850's

Map showing Newlands House and Mains of Newlands in 1850's


Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church

Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church


View from the rear of Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church

View from the rear of Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church


Pulpit at Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church

Pulpit at Merrylea Holy Trinity Parish Church



Dixon Halls, Crosshill

Gorbals
-

Pollokshields, Garden Suburb
-

Govan
-

Strathbungo & Crossmyloof
-

Mount Florida
-

Pollok Park & the Burrell
-

Langside and Battlefield
-

White Cart Walk, Pollok Park
-

King's Park
-

Rivers: Brock, Levern & Cart
-

Castlemilk
-

Pollokshaws & Auldhouse
-

Queen's Park Churches
-

Shawlands & Pollokshaws Churches
-

Muirend to Cathcart
-

Old Cathcart
-

Newlands
-

White Cart Walk, Linn Park
-

Cathcart Circle - A Railway Tour
-

East Renfrewshire Suburbs
-

All original artwork, photography and text © Gerald Blaikie 2016
Unauthorised reproduction of any image on this website is not permitted.

Contact: admin@scotcities.com